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A heavy lifter

Large crane places nuclear module

First Posted: 1:57 pm - July 29th, 2015

Staff Report



The CA01 module is a multi-compartment steel structure within the Unit 2 containment vessel. It is approximately 90 feet long, 95 feet wide, and 80 feet high.
Photos courtesy of SCE&G
South Carolina Electric & Gas Company and its partners have placed the 2.4- million pound CA01 module at the V.C. Summer plant in Jenkinsville. One of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, was used to lift the massive module on July 23.
Photos courtesy of SCE&G
A panoramic view of the crane placing the module.
Photos courtesy of SCE&G
The first six-panel course of nearly 170 shield building panels was placed by workers on July 17. Weighing 30,000 pounds and spanning 40 feet long, each panel will be welded together.
Photos courtesy of SCE&G
Another view of the crane placing the module.
Photos courtesy of SCE&G
One of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, prepares to lift the 2.4-million pound CA01 module that will house a number of major components in the first of two new nuclear plants at the V.C. Summer site.
Photos courtesy of SCE&G
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JENKINSVILLE — South Carolina Electric & Gas Company and its partners have placed the 2.4-million pound CA01 module that will house a number of major components in the first of two new nuclear plants at the V.C. Summer site.

This is the first Westinghouse AP1000 module of its kind to be placed in the United States, and it is the heaviest lift on the V.C. Summer nuclear construction site. One of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, was used to lift the massive module on July 23.

“Successful placement of this major module demonstrates the progress being made with our new nuclear units that are under construction at V.C. Summer,” said Kevin Marsh, SCANA chairman and CEO. “Adding more nuclear energy to our generation mix is the best solution for providing South Carolina large-scale energy that is clean, safe, and reliable, as well as cost-effective over the long-term.”

The CA01 module is a multi-compartment steel structure within the Unit 2 containment vessel. It is approximately 90 feet long, 95 feet wide, and 80 feet high. Considered a super module because it is too large to transport, CA01 was assembled on the construction site in a 12-story Module Assembly Building.

“The successful placement of the CA01 module marks a significant milestone for this project,” said Lonnie Carter, president and CEO of Santee Cooper, co-owner of V.C. Summer. “The new nuclear units at V.C. Summer remain a critical component of Santee Cooper’s long-term plan to diversify our generation mix and to continue to provide low-cost, reliable and environmentally-sound electricity to our customers.”

In addition to this significant milestone, another milestone was achieved just a few days before for V.C. Summer Unit 2.

The first six-panel course of nearly 170 shield building panels was placed on July 17. Weighing 30,000 pounds and spanning 40 feet long, each panel will be welded together. Concrete will then be poured inside the panels to create the shield building. When complete, this reinforced concrete structure will surround the containment vessel for another layer of safety.

The CA01 module is a multi-compartment steel structure within the Unit 2 containment vessel. It is approximately 90 feet long, 95 feet wide, and 80 feet high.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_vcsummer01.jpgThe CA01 module is a multi-compartment steel structure within the Unit 2 containment vessel. It is approximately 90 feet long, 95 feet wide, and 80 feet high. Photos courtesy of SCE&G

South Carolina Electric & Gas Company and its partners have placed the 2.4- million pound CA01 module at the V.C. Summer plant in Jenkinsville. One of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, was used to lift the massive module on July 23.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_vcsummer03.jpgSouth Carolina Electric & Gas Company and its partners have placed the 2.4- million pound CA01 module at the V.C. Summer plant in Jenkinsville. One of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, was used to lift the massive module on July 23. Photos courtesy of SCE&G

A panoramic view of the crane placing the module.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_vcsummer04.jpgA panoramic view of the crane placing the module. Photos courtesy of SCE&G

The first six-panel course of nearly 170 shield building panels was placed by workers on July 17. Weighing 30,000 pounds and spanning 40 feet long, each panel will be welded together.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_vcsummer06.jpgThe first six-panel course of nearly 170 shield building panels was placed by workers on July 17. Weighing 30,000 pounds and spanning 40 feet long, each panel will be welded together. Photos courtesy of SCE&G

Another view of the crane placing the module.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_vcsummer02.jpgAnother view of the crane placing the module. Photos courtesy of SCE&G

One of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, prepares to lift the 2.4-million pound CA01 module that will house a number of major components in the first of two new nuclear plants at the V.C. Summer site.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_vcsummer05.jpgOne of the world’s largest cranes, a heavy lift derrick that stands approximately 560-feet tall, prepares to lift the 2.4-million pound CA01 module that will house a number of major components in the first of two new nuclear plants at the V.C. Summer site. Photos courtesy of SCE&G
Large crane places nuclear module

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