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Color-coded support for family

First Posted: 12:26 am - September 25th, 2015

By James Inabinet - jinabinet@civitasmedia.com



Jenny Sharpe, right, wife of Griffins offensive coordinator Ryan Sharpe, left, was recently diagnosed with Stage 2 adenocarcinoma, a form of cervical cancer that can be difficult to detect. Ryan is holding their son, John Ryan.
Courtesy photo
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FAIRFIELD COUNTY — Over the past decade, football teams have pushed for fans to unite in colors with black-outs, white-outs and even purple-outs.

But the Fairfield Central Griffins this week are asking fans to turn out for Friday’s game in teal and white.They also will be selling teal and white wristbands.

The Griffins, whose colors are black and gold, are trying to raise awareness this week for cervical cancer and to show support to a member of their football family.

Jenny Sharpe, wife of Griffins offensive coordinator Ryan Sharpe, was recently diagnosed with Stage 2 adenocarcinoma, a form of cervical cancer that can be difficult to detect.

The Sharpes were concerned when they found out there was a possibility Jenny could have cancer.

“Not knowing was the worst thing, but we’ve been blessed that we caught it early, that it was stage 2,” he said.

The early detection combined with Jenny’s youth and relative good health serves to bolster her ability to overcome this affliction.

On Monday, she began six weeks of radiation treatments. Despite the obstacles facing them, the Sharpes are remaining positive.

“It’s amazing how much of a difference one day can make in your life,” he said. “One minute everything is going great and the next you’re smacked in the face with adversity.”

Coach Sharpe said he was thankful to Coach Demetrius Davis, Principal Tracy Swilley, the staff at Fairfield Central, and the student body.

“I like say that Jesus is my rock, but after God they have definitely been the support that we’ve needed,” he said.

The American Cancer Society predicted there would be approximately 12,900 newly diagnosed cases of cervical cancer in 2015, and that 4,100 women would die from it. The mortality rate is down significantly over the past several decades and work continues to improve on that. Most cases involve young and middle aged women.

Jenny Sharpe, right, wife of Griffins offensive coordinator Ryan Sharpe, left, was recently diagnosed with Stage 2 adenocarcinoma, a form of cervical cancer that can be difficult to detect. Ryan is holding their son, John Ryan.
http://heraldindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_FCfchscoachcancer.jpgJenny Sharpe, right, wife of Griffins offensive coordinator Ryan Sharpe, left, was recently diagnosed with Stage 2 adenocarcinoma, a form of cervical cancer that can be difficult to detect. Ryan is holding their son, John Ryan. Courtesy photo

By James Inabinet

jinabinet@civitasmedia.com

Reach James Inabinet at 803-635-4016.

englewoodindependent

Reach James Inabinet at 803-635-4016.

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